Self Grading Homework

When my students are working on a particularly difficult topic, I like to know if they’re on the right track.  If I don’t get questions via email or see students in my room the next morning, I begin class without knowing where my students stand with yesterday’s material.  This isn’t exactly ideal.  (I realize I could scrap the idea of homework, but that’s not where I’m headed.)

Instead, I have my students enter the answers to their homework problems into a Google Form.  They’re not submitting all of their work, so it doesn’t take much for me to scan through their answers and quickly get an idea of whether each student is on the right track.

I tried this for the first time last week when my trigonometry students.  I created a Google Form asking for identifying information (first and last name, email address, and class period) and answers to each of the five homework questions.  Since my students do their homework in Notability on their iPads, it was easy for them to quickly enter their answers and submit the form when the were finished with their homework:

Screenshot of Google Form

I checked in on the responses a few times, emailed students who seemed to be way off track and offered some hints based on which problems were wrong.

Screenshot of Form Submissions

I sent emails to students in lines 1 and 3 when I noticed their answers were incorrect.

Then, before class, I used Flubaroo, a script in Google Forms, to “grade” the homework and email students their grade (out of 5) as well as the answer key.  Below is the summary of the grades.  [Note: I did not use this grade, but rather, I gave full credit to students for completing the assignment.]

A summary of the graded homework from Flubaroo

Instead of starting class by asking what questions my students had, I was able to target the one question that  most students struggled with.  Another nice thing about using forms to collect homework responses is the ability to project all of the responses at the beginning of the class period.  When I ask an open-ended question, I like for my students to see all of the different responses and discuss which ones are better explanations.  Thank you Google!

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